5′ or 3.5m tall) is planted extensively along Lake Shore Blvd. Growing sumac, also known as rhus aromatica, requires a cold climate, and it creates a great ground cover for poor or dry soils. Another common wildlife food genus, related to sumac. AND. It is hardy to zone (UK) 2 and is not frost tender. Cooks from many countries, including Turkey, Italy, and Israel, have revered sumac berries (Rhus spp.) Let the berries steep for 10 to 15 minutes. Staghorn Sumac, Rhus Typhina. Fragrant Sumac (Rhus aromatica) Paul Nelson. The edible sumac has terminal clusters of garnet, purse-shaped berries with a fine coating of fuzz (often gray.) Tiny yellow flowers bloom at the twig tips in early spring before the foliage. It is sometimes known as sweet-scented sumac. Rhus trilobata (aromatica), Fragrant Sumac is a very tidy looking deciduous shrub. This is the only variety found in Minnesota. It shares the Latin name rhus with hundreds of other species, several of which are “poisonous,” but not lethal. Sumac, Rhus, are known for their bright fall color and bold leaves. Use Fragrant Sumac in sun or light shade in dryish soil. Typically grows 2-4 feet tall and spreads to 10 feet wide. Desert or little leaf Sumac, Rhus Microphyllia. The fruit is eaten by many species of birds and mammals. It has many attractive features, such as glossy green leaves, rich red leaves in fall, red berries and excellent drought tolerance. Edible. Skunkbush, Skunkbush Sumac, Fragrant Sumac, Aromatic Sumac, Scented Sumac, Ill-scented Sumac, Basketbush, Squawbush Noted for its 3 seasons of interest, Rhus trilobata (Skunkbush Sumac) is an upright arching deciduous shrub forming rounded, moundlike, or upright thickets. The bright green leaves look like rounded poison ivy leaves but are non-allergenic and turn bright red, yellow-orange and purple in the fall. AND. We facilitate and provide opportunity for all citizens to use, enjoy, and learn about these resources. Bayberry. Fragrant sumac is a thicket-forming shrub, with branches ascending or lying on the ground. The low growing habit of this spreading shrub makes it excellent for mass plantings, use as a ground cover and bank control. Getting Started: Sumac is 8 th on our Fabulous Fruit List, and it is an easy beginner forager plant to collect. Getting Started: Sumac is 8 th on our Fabulous Fruit List, and it is an easy beginner forager plant to collect. See more ideas about Sumac, Foraging, Recipes. Fragrant_sumac_fall_color_Portland_10-27-18.JPG, Wildflowers, Grasses and Other Nonwoody Plants. Staghorn sumac is found throughout the northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada. Tolerate: Rabbit, Drought, Erosion, Clay Soil, Dry Soil, Shallow-Rocky Soil, Black Walnut. It is the stems that are pungently fragrant. Male catkins form in late summer and persist throughout the winter until eventually blooming in spring. Flowers late March–April, before the leaves; clusters 1½ inches long, at ends of twigs (not along stems); flowers small, yellowish-green; petals egg-shaped, tips pointed; stamens shorter than the petals. The word “sumac” has come to our language, via French and Latin, from a similar-sounding ancient Syrian/Aramaic word meaning “red.” Fragrant Sumac can be an erect shrub with ascending branches, or it can be a low shrub with spreading branches. A small native Missouri shrub. Fragrant sumac has hairy, reddish fruits (while poison ivy has waxy whitish fruits). More and more gardeners are growing sumac in their landscape and gardens for their bold fall color. Other Common Name : Aromatic Sumac; Polecat Bush. All it needs is an abandoned field, highway median or roadside ditch and it’s happy as can be. The differentiating feature is fragrant sumac does not bear a petiole like poison ivy. All of the sumac species are tough and hardy and make excellent shelter and food for birds. The leaves of fragrant sumac turn brilliant colors in the fall. There are no sharp dividing lines between trees, shrubs, and woody vines, or even between woody and nonwoody plants. See more ideas about Sumac, Sumac recipes, Wild edibles. The leaves and twigs are fragrant when crushed or damaged, a feature that lends the plant its common name. To survive during severe winters, rabbits eat the bark. Species with red berries, including smooth and fragrant sumac, produce edible berries, while species with white berries, including poison ivy, have poisonous berries. Native to much of western North America, it produces female or male plants. There’s nothing like a tasty plant that just loves to grow in just about anywhere, it’s a forager’s dream. Michael Dirr, author of The Manual of Woody Plants, says of fragrant sumac that although it is “somewhat of a second-class citizen”, he “cannot remember any (of the hundreds he has seen over the years) that were offensive”. Once the berry clusters are dry, either all the way, or somewhat, stick the whole cluster into a food processor (but... 3. Fragrant Sumac, Rhus Aromatica. Fragrant sumac is a dense, low shrub that readily spreads by suckers to form thickets. Note: The edible sumac I'm referring to here is any of several red-berried species of sumac (Rhus spp.) All it needs is an abandoned field, highway median or roadside ditch and it’s happy as can be. The Garden wouldn't be the Garden without our Members, Donors and Volunteers. The glossy, blue-green leaves emit a lemon scent when crushed, and turn a mixture of red, burgundy, purple in the fall. Unlike its poisonous relatives, poison sumac and poison ivy, fragrant sumac produces sweet, edible berries that are often used in traditional Native American medicine for stomach aches. Noteworthy Characteristics. But there are couple of safety issues to consider. Trees are woody plants over 13 feet tall with a single trunk. My video on sumacs is here. Birds usually devour Fragrant Sumac berries by June. Rhus aromatica, commonly called fragrant sumac, is a deciduous Missouri native shrub which occurs in open woods, glades and thickets throughout the State.A dense, low-growing, rambling shrub which spreads by root suckers to form thickets in the wild. It has trifoliate (with three leaflets), medium-green leaves that turn orange, red, and purple in autumn. The sumac bush may look like just another roadside shrub. In spring, before the foliage emerges, male plants feature inconspicuous catkins while female plants boast clustered spikes of creamy yellow flowers. Fragrant sumac can make a good foundation planting or a good screen during the growing season; there are a selection of varieties and cultivars available. Family : Anacardiaceae (cashews) Description : Fragrant sumac is a thicket-forming shrub, with branches ascending or lying on the ground. Winged sumac occurs in glades, upland prairies, savannas, openings of upland forests, and open disturbed areas. It is in flower from July to August, and the seeds ripen from September to November. Trifoliate, medium green leaves turn attractive shades of orange, red and purple in autumn. Rhus glabra is a deciduous Shrub growing to 3 m (9ft) by 3 m (9ft) at a medium rate. sumac Fragrant bush up to 7ft tall, red hairy oily fruits, 3-leaf design, yellow flowers, red fuzzy berries. Leaves and twigs are aromatic when bruised (hence the species name). Typically grows 2-4' tall (less frequently to 6') and spreads to 10' wide. The staghorn sumac, named for the velvety covering on its new branches, similar to the velvet on a stags new antlers, is a common and widespread species of edible sumac. Note that it never climbs as a vine up the sides of trees. Fragrant Sumac: Not to be confused with poison sumac, the non-poisonous sumac tree is an absolute must-have, with bright green fronds that transition to fire-engine red as the temperature cools. Here are some of the ways people around the world use it, plus some instructions for harvesting, drying, and using it in a recipe! Aug 15, 2018 - Explore Micayla Oaks's board "Sumac Recipes" on Pinterest. Foraging Sumac- Edible Wild Plant 1. It is the stems that are pungently fragrant. Native to much of western North America, it produces female or male plants. Skunkbush (Rhus trilobata) and fragrant sumac (Rhus aromatica) (in the sumac family, Anacardiaceae) are widespread sumacs.If you think smooth sumac (Rhus glabra) when you think of sumac, you may not recognize them.Instead of a large compound leaf with long leaflets on each side, skunkbush and aromatic sumac have smaller, three-lobed, irregularly-shaped leaves. The shrub was fragrant sumac (Rhus aromatica). Shrubs are less than 13 feet tall, with multiple stems. Comments: Varieties There are three varieties of fragrant sumac (Rhus aromatica) in North America. But sumac's use as a spice is not relegated to the distant past. Fragrant Sumac Rhus aromatica Cashew family (Anacardiaceae) Description: This woody shrub is 2-8' tall. It is known for its striking fall color. We have them literally everywhere on our land . Bayberry (Myrica pensylvanica), a member of the Myricaceae family, grows 6 to 12 feet in height. Occurs in rocky or open woods, in thickets, on glades, and along ledges. Smooth sumac appears much like a small 3 to 5 meters (9 to 15 feet) tall rapidly growing tree. Another common wildlife food genus, related to sumac. Like its cousin poison ivy, fragrant sumac turns lovely colors in the fall. Read on for sumac tree info and growing tips. Staghorn sumac or Rhus typhina grows throughout the northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada. Fragrant sumac has a greater chance of taking the abuse than the other plants and may act as protection for them. Fragrant Sumac, Rhus aromatica, is a little different in appearance as it only has three leaflets to its compound leaves, where the other sumacs have many more leaflets, like 9 to 31 leaflets. Good for stabilizing embankments or for hard-to-cover areas with poorer soils or for wild parts of native plant gardens or naturalized areas. To make sumac spice, you first lay your sumac out to dry. Some susceptibility to leaf spot, rust, scale, aphids and mites. European Sumac, Rhus Coriaria. The fragrant sumac grows as a low, multi-branched shrub with rounded berry clusters rather than the upright conical types. Male plants must be available nearby for pollination to enable the female plants to produce berries. Toxicodendron (the Poison ivy, Poison oak, Poison sumac family.) Sumac trees usually produce flowers in spikes or panicles, that can be 5 to 30 cm in length. Separate male flowers (in catkins) and female flowers (in clusters) appear on the same plants (monoecious) or, more commonly, on different plants (dioecious). But there are couple of safety issues to consider. Although smaller, the leaves resemble in appearance those of the related poison ivy (Rhus radicans). Species with red berries, including smooth and fragrant sumac, produce edible berries, while species with white berries, including poison ivy, have poisonous berries. Fragrant Sumac is a dense multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with a ground-hugging habit of growth. Leaves are alternate, compound with three leaflets, leaflets lacking stalks; terminal leaflet 2–2½ inches long, short stalked, egg-shaped, tip pointed to rounded, margin lobed or coarsely toothed, lower edge lacking teeth; foliage fragrant when crushed. Lemonade … Common to much of Michigan, the Great Lakes region and New England, Staghorn Sumac (rhus typhina) is easily identified by its fuzzy compound leaves and cone-shaped cluster of red berries. East and around the new bus barn on Leslie. It has many attractive features, such as glossy green leaves, rich red leaves in fall, red berries and excellent drought tolerance. The fruit is small with very little flesh, but it is easily harvested and when soaked for 10 - 30 minutes in hot or cold water makes a very refreshing lemonade-like drink (without any fizz of course)[61, 85, 183, K]. A dense, low-growing, rambling shrub which spreads by root suckers to form thickets in the wild. Sumac: The Edible Wild Plant You (Wrongly) Thought Was Always Poisonous. Smooth sumac occurs in open … The fruit is edible and tastes kind of tarty like a Lime. This fruit can be made into a tea. Depending on the variety, it is variable in size and branching habit. The bright green leaves look like rounded poison ivy leaves but are non-allergenic and turn bright red, yellow-orange and purple in the fall. Depending on the type, fragrant sumac can make a good foundation planting or a good screen during the growing season. for more than a thousand years. The taller species (approx. It grows in upland open woods, fields, barrens, and rocky cliffs. Some people make an iced tea from the sour berries, sweetened like lemonade. To the resourceful, all of these plants are both food and medicine. SPECIES / FAMILY: Rhus Aromatica / Anacardiaceae. Looking for fragrant sumac? It has trifoliate (with three leaflets), medium-green leaves that turn orange, red, and purple in autumn. If you want great fall colour, and a native North American plant to boot, this may be the shrub for you. Ancient Roman chefs used sumac berries to produce sour accents. Find local MDC conservation agents, consultants, education specialists, and regional offices. Fragrant sumac (Rhus aromatica), staghorn sumac (Rhus typhina), smooth sumac (Rhus glabra), and winged sumac (Rhus coppalinum) ripen in sequence from midsummer through early fall and are ready to collect when they are red to brown in color (depending on species) and very acidic on the tongue. Anacardiaceae (the Cashew or Sumac family) Rhus (the Cashew or Sumac genus). It has a very attractive arching habit and some of the most beautiful fall color in warmer drier climates. Use as a ground cover, in mass, and an excellent shrub for stabilizing banks and slopes. The leaves and twigs are fragrant when crushed or damaged, a feature that lends the plant its common name. Planting sites: Full or partial sun is best for Fragrant Sumac. The fruit of the Fragrant Sumac native to Arizona, alson known as the Skunk Bush. When most people think of “sumac,” they think of the itchy relative of poison ivy. Female flowers give way in late summer to small clusters of hairy, red berries which may persist into winter. Fragrant Sumac makes a pretty hedge or back of the border, especially if you like a wilder edge to your landscape. Landscaping This plant is sold as an ornamental shrub for sides of buildings and for city streets but not often for yards. I lay mine out on newspaper that I put in a box, which I... 2. All of the sumac species are tough and hardy and make excellent shelter and food for birds. Rhus aromatica, the fragrant sumac, is a deciduous shrub in the family Anacardiaceae native to North America. It grows in almost any well-drained soil and they like full sun or partial shade.